Analysis of BMSCs-intervened viscoelasticity of sciatic nerve in rats with chronic alcoholic intoxication

Abstract Purpose: To investigate the impact of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) intervention on the viscoelasticity of sciatic nerve in rats with chronic alcohol intoxication (CAI). Methods: The CAI rat models were prepared, divided into model groups, and treated with either BMSCs or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Then the rats underwent electrophysiological test and the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and metallothionein (MT) were measured. Histological observation, stress relaxation test, and creep test were performed for the sciatic nerve of the CAI model in each group. Results: The MDA level of group BMSC was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of groups MOD (the CIA model) and bFGF. The SOD and MT levels were higher in group BMSC than in groups MOD and bFGF (p<0.05). The motor nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were higher in group BMSC than in groups MOD and bFGF (p<0.05). The amounts of 7200s stress reduction and 7200 s strain increase of the sciatic nerve in group BMSC were greater than those in groups bFGF and MOD (p<0.05). Conclusion: Bone mesenchymal stem cells can improve the metabolism of free radicals, restore the tissue morphology and viscoelasticity of the chronic alcohol intoxication animal model, and positively affect the repairing of the injured sciatic nerve.