FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH LOW CONCERN ABOUT FALLING IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE OLDER PEOPLE

ABSTRACT Introduction: Fear of falling is one of the main consequences of falls in the elderly; therefore, it is important to investigate the factors associated with the reduction of this fear. Objective: The objective of this study consisted of verifying the associated factors that best explain the low concern about falling in physically active older people. Methods: A total of 162 elderly people with a mean age of 69.95 (SD = 6.69) participated in the study. The diagnostic data sheet, the Falls Efficacy Scale-International, the Senior Fitness Test and anthropometric measurements were used to obtain data. Binary Logistic Regression was used in the data analysis to estimate the Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The p <0.05 Omnibus Test was used to assess the quality of the adjusted model, and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test was applied to verify the explanatory power of the model. Results: In the crude analysis, normal weight elderly subjects (OR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.32-6.20) with good levels of lower limb strength (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.38-5.06), are more likely to have low fear of falling. In the adjusted analysis, the model was able to explain 75% of endpoint occurrence. Conclusion: It is concluded that among the variables analyzed, age, BMI and lower limb strength best explain the low concern about falling in the elderly. Level of Evidence III; Study of nonconsecutive patients; without consistently applied reference “gold” standard.